Julia Ann Corel

Julia Ann Corel is the fourth child born to Henry Highland Corel and Nancy Matney. She was born January 25, 1844 in Tazewell County, Virginia.  Julia was five years old when the families left Virginia to settle in Missouri.  She was only 11 when her parents and older brother died in 1855.  (More details about these childhood experiences can be read on sister Jemima M. Corel’s page.)  After this tragedy, Julia went to live with her uncle James Pickens Corel, where she is found on the 1860 census1.

Willis Myers

Willis Myers was born in February 1838 to China Campbell and Robert Myers in Shelby County, Indiana.  I have seen more than one occasion where Charles W Myers is listed as the father of Willis Myers, but they show the same marriage date as the record I found for the marriage of China Campbell and Robert Myers, August 7, 18282.  Robert Myers is listed on the 1840 census in Jackson, Shelby County, Indiana, aged 30 – 40 years, with his wife, China, aged 30 – 40 years, a girl and a boy (Willis) under 5 years, and a girl (Lydia) and a boy 5 – 10 years3.  Robert and China had another son, Williamson Silas, born in 1841.  Robert apparently died not long after the birth of Williamson, as “Mrs. China Myers” married Abel Yates on November 16, 18434.

Willis Myers is found on the 1850 census in Washington, Buchanan County, Missouri living with his mother and step father, China and Abel Yates.  Willis is listed as “Willis Yates.”  Also in the home are Taylor Yates, Celia Yates, and J K Polk Yates (step siblings), William Myers (brother), and Martha Yates (half sister).  Harvey Bunch, age 26, is also shown living with the family5.  After the new Territory was opened to settlers, Abel Yates moved his combined family into the Kansas Territory in 18546.  The 1855 Kansas Territory Census shows that the Yates/Myers family settled in Douglas County, not too far from Cosby Jane Corel and William Justice7.  Willis Myers was registered to vote at Bloomington, Douglas County, Kansas in the election held on October 9, 18558.  The Post Office at Bloomington was renamed to Clinton in 18589.

Before digging a bit deeper, I was confused to find Willis Myers living alone in Lecompton, Douglas County, Kansas on the 1857 Kansas Territory Census.  In reviewing the census, I found T. LaHay, Frank E. LaHay, John LaHay, Abel Yates, Willis “Myres”, Williamson “Myres”, Blake “Justiss”,  William “Justiss“, Aldolphus “Justiss”, and Athelston “Justiss” listed in this order on the census10.  The 1859 Territory census for Clinton, Douglas County has the same men listed, less Williamson Myers, but it is in alphabetical order, so the proximity between the families is unclear11.  By 1860 Willis and Williamson Myers are back living with their step-father, Abel Yates, in Kanwaka, Douglas County, Kansas Territory.  Abel’s household includes, besides the Myers boys, William J, Martha, and Harriet E Yates, and A. Justice, age 24 from Alabama.  China, the mother of Willis and Williamson Myers, is possibly visiting her daughter, Lydia “Liddie” Myers – Parman; I have been unable to locate either woman in the 1860 census yet.  Among the neighbors of the Yates/Myers household are F. E. “Loha” and wife Nancy Maryland Corel, William Justice and wife Cosby Jane Corel, the household of A. Justice, age 52 from Georgia, and another Yates family, too old to be a child of Abel’s12.

Before moving on, I feel I should point out that at this time I am unaware of a connection between William Justice, husband of Cosby Jane Corel, and the other Justice families found in this area: Blake, Adolphus, and Athelson.

Civil War

Both Willis and Williamson Myers enlisted in the military on July 13, 1861, and both were promoted to the rank of Corporal on September 13, 186113,14.  It is likely that the Myers brothers were originally enlisted in Company D of the 8th Kansas Regiment, as this company of the 8th Kansas was later formed as Company A of the 9th Kansas Cavalry once the group had fully organized on October 24, 1861.  The 9th Kansas Cavalry was officially organized on March 27, 1862 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.  On May 27, 1862 Willis Myers was promoted to Sergeant in Company A15.  On June 10, 1862 Brigadeer General James G. Blunt detached five companies of the 9th Kansas Cavalry and scattered them from the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains.  Company A was on escort duty along the Santa Fe Trail to Fort Union, New Mexico16.

On January 1, 1863, Willis’ brother Williamson Myers was also promoted to Sergeant17.  In February 1863 Colonel Edward Lynde and the 9th Kansas Cavalry was ordered to accompany a supply train to Fort Scott, Kansas18.  On June 7, 1863 two more of Willis Myers’ family members enlisted in Company A of the 9th Kansas Cavalry: step brother J. K. Polk Yates19 and brother-in-law George Parman20 (both were later assigned to the “New Company A”).  In June 1863 Company A under Major Luin K. Thacher operated out of Paola, Kansas as they patrolled the border and scouted into Cass and Bates counties in Missouri21.  By August of that year, Company A was quartered in the Harris House in Westport, Missouri under the direction of Major Thacher.  On August 19, 1863, Major Thacher returned from Kansas City, after a recent attack on that city by a group of bushwhackers.  As Company A was lined up to receive their orders, they learned that they would be traveling without their horses and that “this is a hazardous trip”22.  That night the Company watched over the ford at the Big Blue River.  There they observed several horse tracks with the rebel sign of shoeing.  The rebels used three nails to a side on their horse shoes, rather than the normal four nails.  The next morning the men had breakfast at the home of Nate Price before heading out to the brush and carefully examining all roads and paths, noting that the three-nailed hoof prints all headed in the direction of Kansas.  By mid-afternoon, it was agreed that any trouble was most likely behind the troop in Kansas, rather than where they were headed, so the expedition was abandoned and the company rested until sundown when they began their march towards Westport.  At sunrise on the morning of August 21, 1863 Major Thacher spotted the company returning to Westport and greeted each soldier with a cordial handshake.  He shared with the men that he had received word that Quantrill had entered Kansas with more than 300 men.  He then ordered them to breakfast and took Lieutenant Amozi Steele with him to Kansas City to receive their orders from General Ewing23.

Company A of the 9th Kansas Cavalry was made up mostly of men from Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas.  Each was eager to pursue Quantrill into their homeland, to punish the rebel that would threaten their homes, families, and friends.  After given time to eat and rest their weary feet, when the bugle sounded Company A made formation in record time, but there was still no sight of Thacher and Steele.  After a few hours of standing in formation, Thacher and Steele were finally within eyesight.  The pair moved slowly towards the company deep in conversation, without any attempt to keep the men from learning the topic: there was no orders except to stand at attention and stand guard for an attack.  Thacher and Steele would travel between Westport and Kansas City three more times throughout the day, expecting to receive orders to pursue Quantrill and his raiders, without luck.  Orders were finally received about sundown, after the men of Company A had stood at attention for fourteen hours.  The squadron had traveled 20 miles and were in the town of Olathe when Captain Henry Flesher of Company E approached the line shouting that Lawrence had been burned and all men, women, and children of the town were dead.  In the ranks, colorful language and curses against both Quantrill and Ewing could be heard.  Colonel Edward Lynde urged the men to refocus their attention to capturing Quantrill before he escaped into Missouri.  The battalion then turned south, to cut Quantrill off before he could make it back to Missouri24.

The battalion was met by another messenger 10 miles south of Olathe, in Spring Hill, Kansas.  This messenger related that no women or children had been killed at Lawrence, but that no man or boy had survived the attack.  At sunrise August 22, the Union forces reached a ridge, near present day Hillsdale, Kansas, that would allow several hundred men cover from being seen by those who may be in the valley below.  Major Thacher sent Private Albert R. Greene up the hill to survey the area.  Private Greene saw Quantrill and the bushwhackers less than a mile away, having made their camp along Ten Mile Creek.  The rebels were running around, saddling horses and organizing in a frantic haste.  Private Greene then turned to the west and saw Union forces under Captain Charles F. Coleman’s charge that numbered two to three hundred about two miles out headed towards Quantrill and his men.  Private Greene moved back down the hill and motioned to the men he served with, which easily outnumbered the 300 men that Quantrill reportedly had.  Soon the entire battalion was at the top of the hill with Captain Coleman’s squadron.  The men and the officers were all quite restless to chase after Quantrill, who would not have been more than two miles away by this time.  Colonel Lynde called the regiment to order and announced that they would go down the slope and graze their horses for an hour before pursuing Quantrill25!

After some delay, the regiment was once again in pursuit of Quantrill.  Sergeant Henry C. Davis was called up to the front of the column and received his orders.  As he moved his horse back through the ranks he hollered out for the “first five files” to ride out.  As these ten men followed Sgt. Davis, Col. Lynde motioned to three scouts to join the party.  Lynde gave Davis his orders: to gallop until about a mile ahead of the main battalion and then to slow to a walk to rest the horses some and alternate until the enemy is in sight, engage the enemy in battle, and send a messenger back to gather the reinforcements.  The scouts that joined this small troop were George H. Hoyt, Jeff Denton, and Andy Hammond.  The ten men in the “first five files” included Private Albert R. Greene, Sergeant “Bud” Myers, Commissary Sergeant Robert Huston, Privates John Moore, Ed Kinney, Hiram Rothrock, Graydon McCune, and two “little fellows” who had “swapped numbers” with two taller men26.  I do not know who “Bud” Myers is, but I am certain that it is either Willis Myers or his brother Williamson Silas Myers.

As the small party of soldiers traveled, they came across a great deal of booty that had been cut loose by Quantrill, to ensure his company’s escape.  As their horses were at a walk the group reached the top of a hill when Sgt. Davis and the scouts let out a yell and raced down the hill with the rest of the party close behind.  Quantrill and the bushwhackers had been feeding their horses in a cornfield.  The rebels took off in haste and left yet another large amount of their plunder behind.  A few shots were fired between the rear guards of the rebels and the scouting party of the Union, but no contact was made by either side.  One man was sent back to inform Col. Lynde of the developments and to urge the battalion to hasten their pace.  As soon as the main command was in sight, the lead soldiers took off after Quantrill once more.  There were several long distance skirmishes between the trailing bushwhackers and the leading Kansas Cavalry, as if a game of cat and mouse.  The Union reinforcements kept their distance from the scouting party, not allowing the smaller group the comfort needed to fully engage the rebels.  At nightfall the lead Union soldiers faced a line of rebels that outnumbered them 8 to 1.  Sgt. Davis ordered his troops to form a skirmish line and announced “Quantrill takes no prisoners, boys.”  As the boys from Kansas moved forward to attack, the rebel line broke and retreated.  The soldiers started to follow before they heard the bugle call for a retreat from behind them.  The main command of the battalion had seen that the party was being led into a trap.  The battalion fell back about a half mile for a place to sleep for the night.  The soldiers were ordered to sleep with their weapons ready and their hands on the bridle of their horses27.

The night was silent when suddenly the Union watchman yelled out and started firing.  Quantrill’s voice was heard ordering his men and perhaps a hundred shots were fired by the rebels before the battalion had gathered their wits and started returning fire.  The Cavalry had better position than the enemy, after Maj. Thacher had commanded that the units aim lower when firing, shrieks could be heard as the men were finding their mark.  Quantrill urged his men to continue fighting with their wounds to no avail.  Finally he gave the orders to “Fall back” and the bushwhackers appeared to retreat in confusion.  At daybreak August 23, the pools of blood found on the prairie showed that some of the wounded rebels had received serious wounds.  The battalion had a few wounded, one severely so, but no deaths from the overnight battle.  The soldiers continued to pursue the raiders for the next few days28.

Company A returned to Westport on August 27, 1863 after being in the saddle for more than a week and not having a square meal since breakfast on the 21st.  The men were allowed time to recover from their recent pursuit of Quantrill until September 7, 1863 when the company was ordered to accompany Colonel William Weer of the 10th Kansas Infantry to Paola, Kansas where they were to keep the crowd brought together by Jim Lane and other Free-Staters from raiding Missouri in answer to Quantrill’s raid on Lawrence.  Although the crowd was worked up from speeches by Lane and others, the military presence kept the Kansans from going to Missouri for their own justice.  On September 10, Company A was one of seven cavalry companies sent out in search of Quantrill.  Company A saw a few skirmishes during this service.  The soldiers were in Bates County, Missouri on October 4 when they caught sight of Quantrill’s rear guard.  The cavalry was at a full gallop chasing the bandits when they happened on a ditch 20 feet across and nearly as deep that was hidden by the tall grass.  All but one of the horses recoiled, bucked, or fell into the ravine.  “Sergeant Myers’ race mare, “Black Bess,” took it like a bird and won a cheer of admiration even from the rebels…”  With the others unable to cross the ditch so easily, the rear guards escaped easily.  The Union soldiers continued to pursue the raiders into Nevada, Missouri where on October 6 they came upon an abandoned camp and it was determined that the trail was too cold to continue the pursuit29.

While still in service, Williamson Silas Myers married Sarah Phillips on February 9, 1864.  Other genealogists have listed the location as Lincoln, Kansas, however, Lincoln County, Kansas was not formed until 1870.  As Williamson was still serving at the time of his union, I surmise that the place of the marriage actually took place at Camp Lincoln, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.  Williamson received a promotion to First Sergeant on July 14, 186430.  No evidence of a muster out date has been found for Willis Myers, but it is likely that he mustered out with his brother and the rest of Company A on November 19, 1864 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas31.

Sadly their service in the military did not end so well for J. K. Polk Yates or George Parman.  Polk Yates died from consumption on January 18, 1865 at DeVall’s Bluff, Prairie County, Arkansas32.  Several genealogists online list George Parman’s death as March 21, 1865, whereas one database which references the Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kansas gives a muster out date of June 24, 186533.  In reviewing the Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kansas printed in 1867 (page 871) and 1896 (page 338), I was only able to find “no evidence of muster out date” for George Parman.

Married Life

On December 27, 1864 Miss Julia Ann Corel married Mr. Willis Myers in Douglas County, Kansas.  Their marriage record indicates that both were living in Clinton Township, Douglas County, Kansas at the time of their marriage34.  It is possible that prior to her wedding, Julia Ann Corel was living with her aunt, Nancy Maryland Corel LaHay, and her sister, Margaret Corel, who were living in Clinton Township on the 1865 Kansas census35.  The couple started married life in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas, living with John and Jane Dewitt, as shown on the 1865 Kansas census36.  Later that year, Julia would give birth to the couple’s first child, Edgar Myers.  The couple’s second child, Ida, was born December 19, 1867.

Between 1865 and 1870 Willis Myers moved his family to Neodesha, Wilson County, Kansas37.  Willis and Julia would have three more children while they were living Neodesha: Alma Viroqua, often called “Roqua”, in 1870; Helen Gertrude, who went by Gertrude, in 1873; and Ernest C. in 1879.  The family moved about 55 miles southwest of Neodesha to Chetopa, Labette County, Kansas before 1885.  On July 31, 1881 Julia and Willis’ youngest son, Ernest died in Chetopa, as reported in the August 4, 1881 edition of the local newspaper, the Chetopa Advance38.  I would say that the family had relocated to Chetopa by July 1881, but there is an article in the Wilson County Citizen on July 20, 1883, “Veterans of the War: List of Union Soldiers Living in Wilson County” that lists both Willis (living in Neodesha) and Williamson S. (living in Dun) Myers39.  Surely the family is settled in Chetopa, Labette County, Kansas by March 1, 1885 where they are listed on the Kansas Census40, and a year later, the February 4, 1886 Chetopa Advance announced that Martin and Craft sold their groceries to Willis Myers41.  Willis Myers appears to have taken to community involvement by being listed on the initial charter application for the Benevolent Temperance Society of Chetopa as reported by the January 29, 1891 edition of the Topeka Weekly Capital42.

The 1900 census shows Julia and Willis living on Elm Street in Chetopa, Labette, Kansas having been married for 35 years.  Julia has listed that she had 6 children, 4 of whom are still living43.  Three years later, on September 3, 1903, Willis Myers died while in Welch, Craig County, Oklahoma Indian Territory, located about 15 miles south of Chetopa.  I could not locate Julia on the 1905, 1915, or 1920 census, but I did find her living alone in Chetopa Ward 2, Labette, Kansas in 191044.  By 1925 Julia is living with her daughter and son-in-law, Ida and Willoughby Henry Columbia in Chetopa45.  In 1930, the trio are living in Richland, Labette County, Kansas46.  Several months after the census, Julia passed away on October 14, 1930.

Obituaries and a photo of the shared grave marker for Julia Ann Corel and Willis Myers were included in a blog post on July 28, 2008.

Children

  1. Edgar W. Myers was born about September 1865 in Kansas.
  2. Ida Myers was born December 19, 1867 in Kansas.
  3. Alma Viroqua “Roqua” Myers was born November 9, 1870 in Neodesha, Wilson County, Kansas.
  4. Helen Gertrude Myers was born about July 1873 in Neodesha, Wilson County, Kansas.
  5. Ernest C. Myers was born December 25, 1879 in Neodesha, Wilson County, Kansas and died July 31, 1881 in Chetopa, Labette County, Kansas.
  1. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls. Year: 1860; Census Place: Wakarusa, Douglas, Kansas Territory; Roll  M653_349; Page: 0; Image: 53. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1860usfedcenancestry&h=44025747&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed March 27, 2006)
  2. Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. Indiana Marriages, 1802-1892 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: Microfilm #: 1401799 – 1401800. With some noted exceptions all marriage records in this collection can be found at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, or available through Family History Centers throughout the United States. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=inmarriages_ga&h=128388&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 9, 2009)
  3. Ancestry.com. 1840 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1840. M704, 580 rolls. Year: 1840; Census Place:  Shelby, Indiana; Roll  93; Page: 277. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1840usfedcenancestry&h=2041848&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 13, 2009)
  4. Hunting For Bears, comp.. Missouri Marriages, 1766-1983 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: Missouri marriage information taken from county courthouse records. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=momarriages_ga&h=77485&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 9, 2009)
  5. Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1850. M432, 1,009 rolls. Year: 1850; Census Place: Washington, Buchanan, Missouri; Roll  M432_393; Page: 9; Image: 19. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1850usfedcenancestry&h=3650713&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 9, 2009)
  6. Ancestry.com.. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: 1859 Kansas Territory Census. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=2781402&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 9, 2009)
  7. Ancestry.com.. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: 1855 Kansas Territory Census. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=2209663&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 9, 2009)
  8. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Voter Registration Lists, 1854-1856 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Territorial Government. Territorial Census of 1855 and 1856. Leavenworth, KS, USA: Kansas Territory, 1856. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=katerr1855&h=12515&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 10, 2009)
  9. Kansas Historical Society. “Douglas County Post Offices.” Post Offices in Kansas, 1828-1961. Via Kansas Historical Society website. <http://www.kshs.org/genealogists/places/postoffices.php?county=DG> (accessed June 25, 2009)
  10. Ancestry.com. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: 1856, 1857, and 1858 Kansas Territory Censuses. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=7568843&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 21, 2009)
  11. Ancestry.com. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: 1859 Kansas Territory Census. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=2781299&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 9, 2009)
  12. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls. Year: 1860; Census Place: Kanwaka, Douglas, Kansas Territory; Roll  M653_349; Page: 0; Image: 207. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1860usfedcenancestry&h=44011148&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 10, 2009)
  13. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=15657&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 23, 2009)
  14. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=15656&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7129789_p-362723607_g32768>(accessed July 23, 2009)
  15. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=15613&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 21, 2009)
  16. Transcription provided by Erma Payne, Civil War Round Table of Eastern Kansas. Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kansas, 1861-’65. Topeka, Kansas: 1896 reprint. Via Museum of the Kansas National Guard website. <http://www.kansasguardmuseum.org/9ksvls.html> (accessed July 24, 2009)
  17. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=15614&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t7129789_p-362723607_g32768> (accessed July 21, 2009)
  18. Kansas. Adjutant General’s Office, Josiah B. McAfee. Military history of Kansas regiments during the war for the suppression of the great rebellion. Leavenworth: W.S. Burke, 1870. Page 275. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=dfgsAAAAYAAJ&dq> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  19. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=15771&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 24, 2009)
  20. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=15737&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 24, 2009)
  21. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Page 431. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  22. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Pages 432-433. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  23. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Page 433. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  24. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Pages 434-435. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  25. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Pages 436-437. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  26. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Pages 438-439. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  27. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Pages 440-443. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  28. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Pages 444. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  29. Greene, Albert R. “What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid.” Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1913 – 1914. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, W. R. Smith, 1915. Volume 13, Pages 445-449. Via Google Books. <http://books.google.com/books?id=f7YUAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s> (accessed July 26, 2009)
  30. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=15603&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 23, 2009)
  31. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=15591&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 23, 2009)
  32. Graden, Debra, ed. Kansas Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=kansasadj&h=17806&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 28, 2009)
  33. Historical Data Systems, comp. U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: Data compiled by Historical Data Systems of Kingston, MA. Copyright 1997-2009, Historical Data Systems, Inc., PO Box 35, Duxbury, MA 02331. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=civilwar_histdatasys&h=1907266&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 28, 2009)
  34. Dobbins-Title, Barbara “Bobby”.  “Henry Highland Corel.” The Corel family of Douglas County, Kansas, including Pucketts, McGlothlins, McGees, La Hays, Matneys, Justices and Dobbinses. Compiled 1991, Page 13 of 34 pages in this chapter. Available via The Family History Center in Salt Lake City, UT and The Central Resource Library of the Johnson County, Kansas Library System. Copy in possession of Paula K. Hawk.
  35. Ancestry.com. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: 1865 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-8. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=3867333&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed May 29, 2009)
  36. Ancestry.com. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: 1865 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-8. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=3861505&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 10, 2009)
  37. Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003. Original data: 1870. United States. Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington, D.C. National Archives and Records Administration. M593, RG29, 1,761 rolls. Year: 1870; Census Place: Neodesha, Wilson, Kansas; Roll  M593_443; Page: 430; Image: 143. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1870usfedcen&h=18293564&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 18, 2009)
  38. Dobbins-Title, Barbara “Bobby”.  “Henry Highland Corel.” The Corel family of Douglas County, Kansas, including Pucketts, McGlothlins, McGees, La Hays, Matneys, Justices and Dobbinses. Compiled 1991, page 28 of 34 pages in this chapter. Available via The Family History Center in Salt Lake City, UT and The Central Resource Library of the Johnson County, Kansas Library System. Copy in possession of Paula K. Hawk.
  39. Transcribed by Bill Bentley. “1883 Wilson County Veterans of the War.” Via Kansas GenWeb website. <http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/wilson/library/military/1883union.html> (accessed July 23, 2009)
  40. Ancestry.com. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: 1885 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-146. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=343414&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 23, 2009)
  41. Dobbins-Title, Barbara “Bobby”.  “Henry Highland Corel.” The Corel family of Douglas County, Kansas, including Pucketts, McGlothlins, McGees, La Hays, Matneys, Justices and Dobbinses. Compiled 1991, page 27 of 34 pages in this chapter. Available via The Family History Center in Salt Lake City, UT and The Central Resource Library of the Johnson County, Kansas Library System. Copy in possession of Paula K. Hawk.
  42. “Two Religious Societies and One Temperance Society Chartered.”  Topeka Weekly Capital. January 29, 1891.  Via NewsBank <infoweb.newsbank.com> (accessed July 23, 2009)
  43. Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Year: 1900; Census Place: Chetopa, Labette, Kansas; Roll T623_485 Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 107. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1900usfedcen&h=53127010&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed March 27, 2006)
  44. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910. T624, 1,178 rolls. Year: 1910; Census Place: Chetopa Ward 2, Labette, Kansas; Roll T624_444; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 128; Image: 43. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1910uscenindex&h=8026945&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed July 23, 2009)
  45. Ancestry.com.. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data: 1925 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-177. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=9475097&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed August 4, 2009)
  46. Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2002. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls. Year: 1930; Census Place: Richland, Labette, Kansas; Roll 707; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 2; Image: 16.0. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1930usfedcen&h=33073776&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed August 4, 2009)

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