What’s New Wednesday ~ Sarah Jane Corel

I completed another page the other day.  This one is for the oldest child of Henry Highland Corel and Nancy Matney, Sarah Jane Corel.  Sadly, there isn’t really a great deal on this page, but I did think that since I had found some possibilities, it might be good to throw them out there.  Who knows who might be able to make a connection or prove that there is no connection.

I’m moving a bit slowly, and for that I apologize.  I seem to have that common genealogist attention deficit disorder!  (For those of you who don’t know, the truly funny part is that I do have ADD and even with meds, staying on track when researching is next to impossible!)  I start out with the very best of intentions, then something will catch my eye that will have me looking at other lines and not the one I need to be working on!  At least I am still getting some things done tho, right?  :)   I just looked back and I am proud to say that since the 20th of January (when I returned to working on this site) through this week, there has only been one week where I did not make a blog post.  Several weeks I’ve had more than one post, so I guess that it is good that I’m at least sticking to it!

I’ve been gathering information on the Salathiel line, which is the line of Henry Highland’s third child, Jemima Morris Corel who married John Morgan Salathiel.  I have found some recent obituaries from this line, as well, through Jemima and John’s son Charles who moved to Oklahoma.  I have tried to reach out to one descendant from this line, but have not yet heard back anything.  This descendant didn’t have anything further back than Charles’ son Clarence.  Perhaps he was a bit overwhelmed by how much I was able to offer! ;)

Well, that is all that is going on this week.  I hope that everyone is enjoying the first week of June!

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What’s New Wednesday ~ Wm McGlothlin & 45th Ky Mounted Infantry

It took me a bit longer than I had hoped, but I did get a page completed for Jemima Corel & David McGlothlin’s son William McGlothlin that shares the details of the 45th Kentucky Mounted Infantry during the time that both William and Shadrack served.  It was very interesting learning about some of the goings-on during the Civil War.  I was very sad when I learned of the Saltville Massacre, although there is conflicting viewpoints on the number of men actually killed, that they were killed in such a ruthless manner is very sad no matter how many were involved.

This has me at the end of the children of Jemima Corel & David McGlothlin, since I still haven’t found anything on their son, John beyond the 1860 census.  I haven’t received dates and all from our newly found cousin on this line, so I am going to wait on doing the grandchildren of Jemima and move on to Henry Highland’s children.  I have done some preliminary research on this line, and aside from Jemima Morris Corel, I think this line will make me want to pull out hair, as well!  ;)

Over the holiday weekend I spent some time with Mom and Grandma and got some scans of more photos.  I had a great time and learned more about my family’s history!

I know this isn’t much for What’s New, but it’s all I have!  Researching the 45th Kentucky Infantry was very time consuming.  There isn’t a lot out there on this regiment.

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Tombstone Tuesday ~ Henry H. McGlothlin

Henry H McGlothlin, © All rights reserved

Henry H McGlothlin, © All rights reserved

This photo was taken by John Jackson at Pleasanton Cemetery, Pleasanton, Linn County, Kansas on August 19, 2007.

A few years after his father remarried in Kentucky, Henry H. McGlothlin went back west to live with his grandmother in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas1.  By Spring of 1864 Henry is living in Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas when he enlists into Company K of the 15th Kansas Calvary Regiment2.

The 15th Kansas Calvary dealt with a minor skirmish from time to time while patrolling the Kansas – Missouri border.  October 19, 1864, Major General Alfred Pleasonton and 7,000 cavalrymen were chasing down the infamous Confederate General Price through western Missouri when about 2,000 cavalrymen from the 15th headed towards Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri to aid in slowing down the Confederates3.  The Union was defeated at Lexington, and the Kansas Militia retreated and the next day arrived at the Little Blue River, eight miles east of Independence, Jackson County, Missouri.

A small force was left at the Little Blue Bridge to keep the Confederates from crossing, while the Kansas troops were ordered to Independence.  On the 21st the Kansas Militia was ordered to return to the Little Blue, where it was discovered that the small force had retreated from the prime defensive hold when faced by the numerous Confederate soldiers.  The Union forces tried to take back the defensive location along the river, but a five hour battle took it’s toll on the smaller army and the Union was forced to retreat to Independence4.  The following day, the Army of the Border, which included the 15th Kansas Calvary, established a strong defensive line along the Big Blue River when they were attacked and pushed back from Byram’s Ford, where General Price was able to ford his men and cattle across the river.

The Border Army retreated back to Westport, Jackson County, Kansas as General Price crossed the river.  General Alfred Pleasonton was close behind Price and easily defeated the Rebel division left to protect Byram’s Ford on October 23, 18645.  General Price continued to move his Confederate Army towards Westport, deciding to take on the Army of the Border before dealing with General Pleasonton’s force closing in behind him.  The battle that took place at Westport on October 23, 1864 would have more soldiers than any other battle west of the Mississippi River (about 40,000).  The Army of the Border attacked the Confederates across Brush Creek at Westport.  The Rebels were holding off the attacks until the Union reinforcements from the Big Blue River as well as General Pleasonton’s army reached Wesport.  General Price had no choice but to retreat south.  The Battle of Westport was the deciding factor on the success of Price’s Missouri Expedition.  From this day on, the Confederates were in retreat6,7.

Two days after the Battle of Westport the 15th Kansas Calvary was among the troops that followed Price’s army south to Mine Creek in Linn County, Kansas8.  Although outnumbered more than two to one, the Union forces were able to take control of the area and about 600 Confederate prisoners after only thirty minutes of battle9.  The following year was rather uneventful for the 15th Kansas Calvary.  The regiment mustered out on October 19, 186510.  During his service, Henry H. McGlothlin was promoted to First Sergeant11.

More can be read about Henry H. McGlothlin on his page here on the Corel Cousins website.

  1. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls. Year: 1860; Census Place: Wakarusa, Douglas, Kansas Territory; Roll: M653_349; Page: 0; Image: 53. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1860usfedcenancestry&h=44025741&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed March 27, 2007)
  2. Ancestry.com. Historical Data Systems, comp.. American Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Data compiled by Historical Data Systems of Kingston, MA. Copyright 1997-2009, Historical Data Systems, Inc., PO Box 35, Duxbury, MA 02331. Side served: Union; State served: Kansas; Enlistment date: 23 Mar 1864. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=hdssoldiers&h=5351751&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed May 12, 2009)
  3. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. “Price in Missouri and Kansas: September-October 1864: Lexington II, Missouri (MO023), Lafayette County, October 19, 1864.” Civil War Battlefield Guide (January 1998): 382-382. History Reference Center, EBSCOhost <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=12346181&site=ehost-live> (accessed May 18, 2009)
  4. National Park Service. “Battle Summary: Little Blue River.” The American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP). ParkNet, National Park Service. <http://www.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/mo024.htm> (accessed May 19, 2009)
  5. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. “Price in Missouri and Kansas: September-October 1864: Big Blue River (Byram’s Ford), Missouri (MO026), Jackson County, October 22-23, 1864.” Civil War Battlefield Guide (January 1998): 383-383. History Reference Center, EBSCOhost <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=12346184&site=ehost-live> (accessed May 19, 2009)
  6. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. “Price in Missouri and Kansas: September-October 1864: Westport, Missouri (MO027), Jackson County, October 23, 1864..” Civil War Battlefield Guide (January 1998): 384-384. History Reference Center, EBSCOhost <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=12346185&site=ehost-live> (accessed May 19, 2009)
  7. National Park Service. “Battle Summary: Westport, MO.” The American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP). ParkNet, National Park Service. <http://www.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/mo027.htm> (accessed May 19, 2009)
  8. National Park Service. “15th Regiment, Kansas Calvary.” Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System. <http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/index.html> (accessed March 13, 2009)
  9. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. “Price in Missouri and Kansas: September-October 1864: Big Blue River (Byram’s Ford), Missouri (MO026), Jackson County, October 22-23, 1864.” Civil War Battlefield Guide (January 1998): 383-383. History Reference Center, EBSCOhost <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=12346187&site=ehost-live> (accessed May 19, 2009)
  10. Ancestry.com. Historical Data Systems, comp.. American Civil War Soldiers (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Data compiled by Historical Data Systems of Kingston, MA. Copyright 1997-2009, Historical Data Systems, Inc., PO Box 35, Duxbury, MA 02331. Side served: Union; State served: Kansas; Enlistment date: 23 Mar 1864. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=hdsregiment&h=3411&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed May 12, 2009)
  11. National Park Service. U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007. Original data: National Park Service, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, online <http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/>, acquired 2007. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=nps_civilwarsoldiers&h=4225959&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed May 12, 2009)
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What’s New Wednesday ~ William McGlothlin

In browsing around the internet, I have found a bit more on the fourth child of Jemima Corel and David McGlothlin, William McGlothlin.  Previously, I had been unable to locate William beyond the 1850 census in Jackson County, Missouri1.  After some further searching for “Wm McLaughlin”, I was able to find Jemima’s missing son on the 1860 census living with the James A. Ward family in Johnson County, Kentucky2.

The fact that he is living with a Ward family intrigued me enough to dig to find the connection between this family and William’s brother-in-law, George Washington Ward and step-brother, Jonathan Ward.  George W. and Jonathan Ward are cousins, their fathers, James Whitehead Ward and Jonathan Ward respectively, were the sons of Susannah Oney and Solomon Ward.  Ironically, George W. and Jonathan Jr. are cousins from their maternal sides as well, Lucinda Meek and Melinda Meek respectively.  The mother of Lucinda and Melinda is a Judith Hylton.  Judith’s sister Levina Hylton married Shadrack Ward, brother of Solomon Ward.  Shadrack and Levina are the parents of James Apperson Ward, who has young William McGlothlin living with his family in 1860.  To try to clear this up a bit, I made the following:

Ward - McGlothlin Connections

You can click on the image to see the full sized view for easier reading.  I know it’s still confusing, but this was the best I could come up with.  Be thankful I kept working on it and didn’t decide to use the first graph I made!!  :D

After making this find of William McGlothlin on the 1860 census, I decided to search a bit more and see if I could find anything else.  Interestingly enough, I have found that he also fought in the Civil War, alongside his brother, Shadrack, in Company F of the 45th Kentucky Volunteer Mounted Infantry3.  Although I still have not found any proof of a marriage, nor any evidence of when William may have died, I have decided to create a page for William to share the information I have found of his service during the Civil War.  That page should be up by the end of this week!

  1. Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1850. M432, 1,009 rolls. Year: 1850; Census Place: Kaw, Jackson, Missouri; Roll: M432_402; Page: 237; Image: 22. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1850usfedcenancestry&h=3817931&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed 3/27/2007)
  2. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls. Year: 1860; Census Place:  , Johnson, Kentucky; Roll: M653_378; Page: 0; Image: 230. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1860usfedcenancestry&h=39672854&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed 5/12/2009)
  3. Ancestry.com. Original data: Report of the adjutant general of the state of Kentucky. Frankfort, Ky.: Printed at the Kentucky Yeoman Office, J.H. Harney, public printer, 1866-1867. Volume II, Schedule A, Page 451. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=genealogy-glh43635757&h=1442&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed 5/12/2009)
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Tombstone Tuesday ~ Shadrack McGlothlin

Shadrach McGlothlin

Shadrack McGlothlin, © All rights reserved

This photo was taken by John Jackson at Pleasanton Cemetery, Pleasanton, Linn County, Kansas on August 19, 2007.

Shadrack McGlothlin was the youngest child of Jemima Corel and David McGlothlin, born in April 1847 in Tazewell County, Virginia.

At the age of 16, Shadrack mustered into Company F of the 45th Kentucky Mounted Infantry in Ashland, Boyd County, Kentucky on November 2, 18631 to fight with the Union in the Civil War.  Many documents have Shad listed as “Shadrack McGlathlin”.

By 1885 Shadrack moved his family to Pleasanton, Linn County, Kansas2, where his older brother, Henry H. McGlothlin had settled.  Shadrack remained in Pleasanton until his death on February 4, 1906.  More can be read about Shadrack McGlothlin on his page here on the Corel Cousins website.

  1. Ancestry.com. Original data: Report of the adjutant general of the state of Kentucky. Frankfort, Ky.: Printed at the Kentucky Yeoman Office, J.H. Harney, public printer, 1866-1867. Volume II, Schedule A, Page 452. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=genealogy-glh43635757&h=1443&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed 5/12/2009)
  2. Ancestry.com. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009. Original data:  1885 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-146. Kansas State Historical Society. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ksstatecen&h=414234&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt> (accessed 3/27/2007)
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